Travel to Egypt

Day 6 Kom Ombo - Edfu - Esna

Egypt


 

From Aswan to Luxor, tourists embark on one of the more than three hundred boats that travel daily Nile River, to admire the monumental Egypt while enjoying a quiet stroll through the waters of one of the longest rivers in the world. It´s very typical the party dress of the boat, dressing exotic clothes and other gadgets that can be purchased at any flea market. The first stop was at Kom Ombo, continuing to Edfu, Esna and Luxor. In the Nile, it is common to see falucas and old barges between luxury cruises, sailing between Cairo and Aswan.

Temple of Edfu
Edfu - Rear wall

Edfu: The western side has an inner wall and another exterior wall built during the Old Empire. on the outside of the second wall is a wall later, just as to the base of the pylon of a temple of Ramses III. The temple later reflects the influence of his predecessor through the alignment of a door in his yard with the first being between the two clumps of primitive pylon. It is the best preserved temple in Egypt. The inscriptions on the walls provide many details about the construction. Started work the year 237 with Ptolemy III Evergetes I.

Edfu - Horus
Edfú - Estatua de Horus

After the pylon is the courtyard of columns with paired capitals or in different ways. The doors leading to the rear of the temple until an area enclosed by a stone wall which is the continuation of the outer wall of the courtyard. The scenes and inscriptions both here and in the outside wall of the compound include a list of gifts to the temple and a great number of reliefs with a "dramatic" text of a certain ritual in which the god Horus defeated his enemy Seth.

Temple of Edfu
Edfu - Entrance to the temple

The naos may have contained a wooden chapel with an image of the god, probably about 60 cm. tall and carved their time in wood and covered with gold and semi precious stones. It is the object's oldest temple, in times of Nectanebo II. In the southern part of the ambulatory reliefs are sheltered from the prevailing wind from the north. Some even retain their color, giving an idea of the effect that they should produce the wide range of tones that were used at that time. Edfu lost furniture and equipment when he owned was left out of use. Therefore, we can consider ourselves lucky to behold a couple of colossal statues of falcons that flank the entry, as well as the one that was at the door of the hypostyle hall.

Edfu - Courtyard of columns
Edfu - Courtyard of columns

Esna: The temple of Esna far about 200 meters from the river and is at the heart of the modern city. Due to the accumulation of debris stored throughout the periods of occupation, the temple is now up to 9 meters below street level. The ceremonial ride, which probably joined the dock with the temple, had disappeared. The pier has cartouches of Marcus Aurelius and is still in use. The temple is dedicated to Khnum, along with other deities, the most prominent of whom were Neit and Heka, whose name means "magic power".

Esna - Temple of Khnum
Esna - Temple of Khnum

It consists only in a hypostyle hall that has been preserved complete and whose western wall was the beginning of the inside temple. That wall is above the rest, and preserved reliefs from Ptolemy VI Filometor and Ptolemy VIII Evergetes II. The rest of the hypostyle hall is the largest temple of the Late Period that has been preserved, and is decorated with reliefs of the I-III centuries AD. The scenes of gods and of the pharaoh puting the networks to the birds are the most impressive. The most significant feature of the decoration is the series of papers written in his columns. They provide an abundant and detailed description of the festival of the sacred year of Esna, presented in the schematic form of a timetable and also recorded in a column. There is also an excellent pair of cryptographic hymns to Khnum, one written almost exclusively with hieroglyphs of rams, and the other written with crocodiles.


 

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Egypt