Travel to the Black Forest

Day 6 Strasbourg

(in 85 Km.) Strasbourg: Is the capital and principal city of the Alsace region. In 2009 the urban area of Strasbourg had 1,175,393 inhabitants an d was the fourth largest in France. Strasbourg´s historic city centrewas classified a World Heritage site by UNESCO in 1988 and tourism is very intense. His most point of interest is the Grande Île , the historic centre of Strasbourg, is an island in the Ill river. The French name translates literally as Grand Island.

Strasbourg - Ponts Couverts

Strasbourg - Ponts Couverts

The city has many bridges, including the medieval, four-towered Ponts Couverts. We start our tour at this point because here is easy to park. These have kept their name despite the fact that they lost their roofs back on the 18th century. They are overlooked by four towers dating from the 14th century, which are the remains of the former ramparts. Next to it is a part of the 17th-century Vauban fortifications, the Barrage Vauban. The Barrage Vauban is a weir erected in the 17th century. It was constructed from 1686 to 1700 by the French Engineer Jacques Tarade according to plans by Vauban. It has a panoramical terrace on its roof.

Strasbourg - Petite France

Strasbourg - Petite France

We continue towards Petite-France, located inside the Grande Île, where the river Ill splits up into a number of canals and cascades through a small area of medieval half-timbered houses and baroque sandstone buildings. In the Middle Ages, the Petite-France was the tanning-houses and slaughterhouses area. Its magnificent houses dating from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. It is very pleasant to stroll along the cobbled streets of the Petite France, seeing their houses full of flowers and lots of romantic restaurants.

Strasbourg - Cathedral

Strasbourg - Cathedral

Strasbourg houses several medieval churches that have survived the many wars and destructions that have plagued the city: highlight the Romanesque Église Saint-Étienne, partly destroyed in 1944 by Anglo-American bombing raids, the part Romanesque, part Gothic, very large Église Saint-Thomas with its Silbermann organ on which Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and Albert Schweitzer played or the Gothic Église Saint-Pierre-le-Jeune Protestant with its crypt dating back to the seventh century and its cloister partly from the eleventh century. Saint-Pierre-le-Vieux Catholique serves as a shrine for several 15th-century wood worked and painted altars coming from other.

Strasbourg -  Astronomical clock

Strasbourg - Astronomical clock

The Cathedral of Our Lady of Strasbourg (Notre-Dame de Strasbourg), at 142 metres, was the world´s tallest building from 1647 to 1874. Sandstone from the Vosges used in construction gives the cathedral its characteristic pink hue. The construction began with the quire and the north transept in a Romanesque style in 1176 and finish in 1439. The cathedral´s south transept houses an 18-metre astronomical clock, one of the largest in the world. On the main facade highlights tympanums topping the three portals decorated with various sculptural groups inspired by events in the life of Christ. At the bottom of the rosette highlights the rich sculptural group called "gallery of the apostles".

Strasbourg - Maison Kammerzell

Strasbourg - Maison Kammerzell

On the Place de la Cathédrale we find the Kammerzell House. Built in 1427 but twice transformed in 1467 and 1589, the building as it is now historically belongs to the German Renaissance but is stylistically still attached to the Rhineland black and white timber-framed style of civil architecture. The building´s inside has been decorated on all floors by lavish frescoes. Other points of interest in Strasbourg are Place Kléber Square, the Palais Rohan. Palais du Rhin, boulevards and avenues, the Opera House on Place Broglie, Place de la République, etc.

Strasbourg - European Parliament

Strasbourg - European Parliament

The city of Strasbourg is the official seat of the European Parliament. The Parliament´s buildings are located in the Quartier Européen (European Quarter). The Louise Weiss building, With its surface of 220,000 square meters and its distinctive 60m tower, was built at a cost of 470 million euros at the intersection of the Ill and the Marne-Rhine Canal. It houses the hemicycle for plenary sessions, the largest of any European institution (785 parlamentary seats and 680 for visitors), 18 other assembly rooms as well as a total of 1133 parliamentary offices.